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say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, shares seem to be fwllat. bundesbank announced it had cut its growth outlook for the country. in the u.s., the nasdaq snapped its losing streak yesterday with its first gain in five days. the dow was on pace for
superstorm sandy. find out at 8:30 a.m. eastern. and cut! very good. o geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? >>> welcome back to "squawk box" everyone. the futures right now are at this point right around the flat line. we had seen the dow futures up by 15 points or so, it's come back down but probably a lot of people waiting to see what happens in washington because it's been driving trading for several weeks. >>> honda is expecting within two years it will export more vehicles than it imports from japan. the company says the factories will take on a larger role in global product development at that point. >>> all right, i've been wanting to ask larry some specific questions and i'm going to do it now because actually some of the stuff you talk about doug oberhelm, you teach economics, you're an economic sage so the mantra and we heard it again that if we could get rid of the, which is hard, but is the obama's administration resi
shopping season is going so far. we know that those november retail sales reflected sandy and some other one-time issues. what do you think really is happening behind the scenes in terms of what's happening for holiday shopping? >> well, i think it's the same story every year. the promotions start early, black friday's always a big weekend, this year was no different, and it depends on who you listen to nrf was very optimistic about the estimates, gallup was not so much, and then the sandy-related numbers. there are clear winners and losers here. it's the sandy blameathon, clearly, but some of the winners and losers walmart and limited. >> walmart and limited. who do you think is in trouble. we saw gap shares down by 7%. is that a reflection of the dividend they won't be paying or the special dividend. is there something more with what's going on with stores there? >> well, i think everybody's nervous now, certainly. again, after you saw the tough numbers in november, the question is, do retailers get nervous? do they press the pedal in terms of more and more promotions? gap yesterday wa
, coupled with the fact we just came off of hurricane sandy, this is not the time to play games and taunt one another with these plans that everybody knows are not real plans. >> i agree, but i think we should look beyond one year's growth. we're talking about growth through 2050. the gentleman pretending to know he knows the growth rate between now and 2050 -- >> he gets paid to make predictions, steve. that's what he's doing. by the way, his former predictions have been right. let's give him that. >> some of them have been right. there was a guy in the 19th century who predicted we were all going to starve as he predicted the proplatiopulation of the world with but forgot to predict the agricultural technology. you can't hold one constant and let the other variable be a variable. >> right now this country is focusing on policies that continue to predistribute from the most productive members to those that may be more favorable. that's his point, that we've continued to lose momentum for the past several decades and continuing to implement those same policies that are going to undermine
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4